Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Measuring mates



This Term I have just finished my Measuring Mates & things. It was quite interesting to know how to measure from. On measuring tapes there are centimetres and millimetres. I hope you enjoy my maths work.

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Writing - I have a Dream

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago,  a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we’ve come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the “ unalienable Rights ” of “ Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. “ It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come marked “ insufficient funds. ”

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.




We have also come to this hallowed sport to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow of steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.
We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “ When will you be satisfied? ” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. *We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: “For Whites Only.”* We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest - - quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood
I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification”-- one day right there Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”2

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the south with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day -- this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning:

My country ‘tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.
Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride,
From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.
And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.
Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.
Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.
Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.
Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.
Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.
Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.
From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at Last!
      Thank God Almighty, we are free at last3

Finding the difference by measuring - Movie



Today we have just finished our video, what our video is about is it is demonstrating of What is the difference between the numbers. Here is a video that shows what we have be explains to you guys, we hope you enjoy that movie. One little tip the movie is about our height. Enjoy the movie. :) :)

Saturday, 22 July 2017

Day 7, Bonus Activity

After a long soak in the natural hot pools, it is time to get back home. Your family and friends can’t wait to see you and they can’t wait to hear all about your adventures. Take a moment to think about what you have seen and done over the past week.
On your blog, post a video or write a description about your week. What have you learned? What did you like about the trip? What didn’t you like? Was there anything that surprised you?
Winter Learning Journey 2017.  I have to admit when my parents said they were going to make me do the Winter Learning Journey, I was not happy.  It’s the school holidays!  I really wasn’t looking forward to doing any “school work” over the holidays.  My parents thought that it would be good for me to participate because I have a love-hate relationship with writing.  My parents promised that they would help to achieve learning journey activities.  
Reluctantly, I began the learning journey expecting that my parents would just forget about it.  You see we don’t have the internet at home, and we have to go to the local library or to my dad’s work and use the WIFI there.  I knew that my parents were helping out at my brother’s rugby school holiday program, so I wouldn’t have to do anything.  Yeah right!
My parents had actually read a lot about the weekly activities for the Winter Learning Journey and had planned for us to do things in and around Auckland.  In my video you will see that we actually visited a few places in Auckland, and tried to make paper mache ”Moa Eggs”, that didn’t really work out.  We are going to SkyTower this Sunday for my brother’s birthday, and we have a few more places to visit planned for this term.


What did I learn?
I want to go to Owhango to visit the Blue Duck Station
Having my family help me makes it FUN and less like schoolwork
New Zealand is an amazing country, and I get to live here
We all need to do our part to keep Aotearoa clean and beautiful


What did I like about the trip?
I got to visit places in New Zealand that I haven’t visited before, but am excited about visiting.
I liked seeing other people's learning about other endangered native wild-life
It didn’t cost a lot of money to visit the South Island
Was there anything that surprised you?
The Winter Learning Journey has been an experience that I have loved being a part of.  I was surprised how involved I became.


A huge THANK YOU to Rachel and the team for working really hard to put this all together.  I know it has helped me with my reading and writing.  But most importantly, my family have spent time together doing things we wouldn’t normally do.  We made some great memories and plans to make more.

Nga mihi aroha ki a koutou, ka kite ano...Na Jasmyne

Day 7, Activity 2

After you have finished up in Taupo, it is time to hop back in the car and head for Rotorua – a town where will have the chance for some much needed rest and relaxation. In fact, you will visit the Tarawera Bush Pool – a geothermal hot pool that is located in the middle of a forest. The warm water in the pool comes from underneath the ground. After a few hours in the pool you feel really relaxed.

On your blog, post a picture of yourself doing something relaxing.
Now this is my idea of relaxation... Reading a book.

Day 7, Activity 1

While in Taupo, you go for a walk around the lake and you notice pieces of rubbish floating in the water. You also notice that there is rubbish on the footpath. As you know, it is really important to put rubbish in the bin and keep New Zealand clean and beautiful for generations to come.
With that in mind, it is time think about what you can do to keep New Zealand beautiful. Use your imagination and come up with three things that you could do to make your neighbourhood more beautiful. Post your list on your blog ☺

How can I make my neighbourhood more beautiful?
  1. Daily Exercise and Rubbish Pick-Up - as my family and I go for our morning exercise around our neighbourhood, we could pick up rubbish as we go and see who collected the most, gets out of dishes duty for the day.
  2. Monthly Yard Help - My family and I could help the elderly people on our street with any yard work, rubbish collecting around their yards that might need doing.
  3. I would really love to have a doggy do-do bag dispenser and doggy do-do bin set up somewhere in our neighbourhood.  This would help with doggy do-do we have on people's’ lawns.

I think that if I did these things this would help my neighbourhood look more beautiful.

Day 6, Bonus Activity

As part of the Matariki festival, there is a two day Kapa Haka competition. The haka is a traditional war dance that Maori performed before going into battle. The haka is now performed by children/adults in the community and by professional sporting teams, including our national rugby team, the ‘All Blacks.’  The All Blacks have performed various haka over the years. Watch the following three haka videos (1 – 3) and, on your blog, list the haka videos in order from best (#1) to worst (#3). There are no right or wrong answers ☺
#1. World Cup 2015 – All Blacks vs Argentina result 26-16 (RWC 2015 Match)
#2. All Blacks vs South Africa 2016 ( 41-13) ABS Win
#3. Rugby World Cup 2011- All Blacks vs France (RWC 2011 8-7) ABs win! Piri

HAKA REVIEW
I think I have mentioned before that my family is RUGBY MAD!  So I felt it only right to invite my family to watch and rate the 3 haka performances.  We all agreed that every haka is special, amazing and powerful, but some haka were that much more special because they helped to set the tone for the All Blacks and go them hyped up.   
1st Place
(Piri Weepu, Ali Williams, Richard Kahui were awesome in this haka)
2nd Place
3rd Place


Day 6, Activity 2



After visiting Shag Point, you hop back in the van and drive all the way up the east coast of the south island until you reach the town of Picton. You get out of the van and onto the Interislander ferry. It travels back across the Cook Strait to Wellington. Wellington is the capital city of New Zealand and every winter the city hosts a huge Matariki festival to celebrate the Maori New Year. This year part of the festival is being held at Te Papa, a big museum in Wellington.
Read about the Matariki festival at Te Papa.  There are so many different things to see and do at the festival this year. On your blog, tell us about three of the events. You can choose any three events that you wish.



Wow!  Te Papa celebrates Matariki in a big way.  Not only are they doing lots of things here at Te Papa, but all over Wellington.  I have picked 3 events I would really loved to have gone to.

  1. Nga Kai o Matariki: Celebrating Maori Cuisine - Food!  Food!  Glorious Food!  I love food and so does my family.  I would have loved to have learnt how to make some traditional Maori kai as well as taste test some as well.  I did see that Sarah and Jay from My Kitchen Rules were going to be speaking as well.
  2. Star Weave Jam - This was an event where people could join in and make an 8 point star out of ribbon, to raise awareness about domestic violence.  Lots of people from around the world, had joined the project and sent stars that they had made to join with those made during Matariki here in New Zealand.  I like to do arts and crafts, but also this would have been for a good cause.
  3. Kaumatua Kapa Haka - how awesome to watch kuia and koro perform some old waiata.  My grand-uncle, Michael and his wife were part of this event.  I would have loved to have watched them.

Day 6, Activity 1

Let’s imagine that you were on the first waka to arrive at Shag Point. You had never been to New Zealand before and you had no idea what to expect. Write a poem describing how you would have felt when you arrived in New Zealand. Would you have been excited or scared? I would have felt pretty nervous, I reckon…
C:\Users\rwil313\Desktop\Waka picture.jpg

We came from afar
All I see are ngā kapua ma (white clouds)
What if the people are freaky
In this whenua kakariki (green earth)
Hey wait we are the only ones here
There really is no need to fear
A beautiful home we will make
Aotearoa is ours to take

Day 5, Activity 2

After the adventure at The Lewis Pass Scenic Reserve, you are pretty happy to get back into the shuttle van and continue with your road trip. Over the next few hours you travel up and over the Southern Alps, arriving in the city of Christchurch to eat lunch. You have a delicious meal at a café downtown and then hop back into the van to travel to Twizel, a small town at the base of Aoraki-Mt Cook. Mt Cook is the largest mountain in New Zealand. It is also the mountain where Sir Edmund Hillary trained for his climb up Mt Everest the tallest mountain in the world. Sir Edmund Hillary is very famous because he was the first person to ever reach the top of Mt Everest!

Now it is your turn to learn about a famous New Zealander. Use Google to research one famous person from New Zealand and then create a DLO (Digital Learning Object) and post it on your blog. Be sure to include: 1. The name of the famous person, 2. Where they were born, 3. Why they are famous, and 4. Two other interesting facts about them.

Day 5, Activity 1

After a few hours in the car, you, your group and Curious Kiwi arrive at your first stop – The Lewis Pass Scenic Reserve. It is a beautiful, regional park located at the base of the Southern Alps. You and your group get out of the van and follow Curious Kiwi. He is going to lead you on a short walk through the park. As you start walking, you notice a really cool looking tree on the side of the trail and you stop to take a closer look. When you turn back, the group (and Curious Kiwi) is nowhere to be found. Eek! You are all alone in the middle of a strange forest.
For this activity write a short story (8-10 sentences) about what might happen next. Please be sure to include lots of details about what you might be feeling, seeing and doing after you realise that you are all alone in the forest...

No way!  It can’t be…
Hey guys, look at that tree over there, it looks just like Bruno Mars...only greener, and more wood-like.  Guys?  Hey guys?  
I turn back to see that no-one is behind me.  I can’t even hear any other voices, no footsteps.  Surely, I can’t have moved that far from the group.  I was just excited about this tree.  Actually, the more I look at it close up, it looks just like every other tree here.
My heart starts to beat a little faster, my eyes flit this way and that, hoping to catch a glimpse of Curious Kiwi’s hi-vis vest.  I am surrounded by the sounds of the bush.  I am starting to panic.  I hate being alone in the dark.  It feels cold here in the forest, I don’t like the idea of staying here in the dark forest, alone.  I begin to cry.  I don’t know what else to do, if I try to walk back the way I think I came, I could get more lost.

I say a little prayer hoping that someone will find me soon, I don’t want to be stuck here.  As soon as I finish my prayer, I begin to feel better.  I know that I am going to be fine. And alright.

Day 4, Activity 2



After a morning of learning about beached whales in Golden Bay, you and your group are driven to a nearby town, Nelson, to watch a special movie calledWhale rider.’ It is a famous movie about a young girl who was born and raised in New Zealand. Watch the following movie trailers for Whale Rider: Whale Rider trailer #1 and Whale Rider Trailer #2 and then write a summary of the movie on your blog. What is it about? Be sure to also give the movie a rating out of 5 based on the trailer [1 = bad movie, 2 = okay movie, 3 = pretty good, 4 = good movie, 5 = excellent movie].

C:\Users\rwil313\Desktop\Whale Rider movie poster.jpg

Name of the Film: Whale Rider
Based on a book “The Whale Rider”, written by a famous New Zealand author, Witi Ihimaera.
Where is it set?
The movie is set in beautiful New Zealand, in Auckland and a place on the East Coast of New Zealand called Whangara.  Interesting fact: My grandfather lived here when he was a little boy, before moving to Gisborne.
What is the movie about?
This movie is about a girl named Paikea.  The name of an old Maori tupuna of hers, that arrived in Aotearoa on the back of a whale.  The name was handed down to firstborn boys only.  

Paikea’s naming causes disagreements in her family.  Her koro (grandfather) claims that because of Paikea, their family has experienced hardships and trials.  

In an attempt to make things right, Paikea’s koro tries to train up the other firstborn boys in the area.  Paikea is left out and is then taught the skills that all the boys are learning by another man, her uncle perhaps..

I think this movie teaches about the traditions of Maori, love and courage.

Who are the stars?
Keisha Castle Hughes, Cliff Curtis.  Witi Ihimaera was an Associate Producer

Rating:
[1 = bad movie, 2 = okay movie, 3 = pretty good, 4 = good movie, 5 = excellent movie].
I would rate this movie a 4=good movie.  

I think my family and I will try and watch this before the holidays finish.  Will keep you posted.